Protect capitals in title without homogenization of all entries


Some titles typically capitals some not. I would like to use them as they were originally published. Consequently it would be nice that capitals become protoceted without changing titles that don’t contain capitals. The final database may look inconsitent but the titles can be cited as they were published.

Please vote if you support this proposal:

  • I would like to have this feature, too!
  • I don’t care.

0 voters

(joerg.lenhard) #2

Hi Zilon,

so what sort of feature are you actually asking for? From what I read a formatter that protects all capital letters and can be configured as a save action would be exactly what you are asking for. This would be pretty easy to implement.

However, I need to point out that the casing of titles is the realm of the bibliography style that you use. If you force capitalization by protecting all title, you will violate the formatting regulations of most publishers.



Hi Joerg,

so far, there are some save actions that work in combination with titles:

  • Capitalize - Capitalizes every first letter and sets the rest to lower case.
  • Lower case - Sets every letter to lower case
  • Protect terms - Protects the case of acronyms month names and countries
  • Sentence case - Capitalizes first word, sets anything ales to lower case
  • Title case - Like Capitalize except of conjunctions, articles and prepositions
  • Upper case - Capitalizes everything

Most entries in my database either correspond to sentence case or tile case and I want to keep the sentence case entries to be sentence case if I select the title case save action. The latter is necessary because LaTex typically handles every entry as if it was sentence case unless curly braces are set around the capital letters.


(joerg.lenhard) #4

Hi Thomas,

thanks, I think I understand it a little better now.

What you want is a formatter that takes the title as it is written in the title field and wraps all sequences of uppercase letters in curly braces (please correct me if this is not what you mean). As an example Hello, I am a TITLE would get {H}ello, {I} am a {TITLE}.



Hello Joerg,

yes, that’s exactly what I meant.

Thanks and regards

(Honza) #6

Hi everybody,

first of all thanks for your efforts!

I have the same problem as Joerg has. If I’m not mistaken, there used to be the function:

Options - General - File - “Store the following fields with braces around capital letters”

Perhaps I’m just blind from staring at a screen, but I can’t find this option anymore (see screenshot):

I’m using JabRef 4.0. I don’t want to protect certain word classes. Instead I want to protect all the capital letters in my bib-file. Thanks in advance for your help!

(Tobias Diez) #7

Have a look at the cleanup dialog. The dropdown box under “field formatters” should contain the “protect terms” formatter.

(Honza) #8

Thanks for the quick reply.

I do find the “protect terms” formatter (see screenshot), but it doesn’t provide me with an option such as “Store the following fields with braces around capital letters”.

It provides “protect terms”, which actually doesn’t change much for my file because the terms registered in my “protected terms” file include only “months and weekdays in English”, “countries adn territories in English”, and “Electrical engineering terms”. I’m working on and with several other languages, so this doesn’t apply to my literature.

I don’t want to distinguish between terms, but simply put all capital letters in braces. Hope we can find a solution together.

best, H

(Tobias Diez) #9

Ok, I now understand what you are trying to do. Sadly, this is currently not possible. The “protect terms” formatter is the best we offer at the moment.

By the way, the standard is to protect the whole word instead of only the captial letter, i.e. {JabRef} {Is} {Cool} instead of {J}ab{R}ef {I}s {C}ool (because Latex then handles the kerning better).

(Christoph) #10

I think the handling of capitalization is more a latex style feature and should not be enforced directly in the bib, except for some acronyms or whatever (aka protected terms).